Gastric Bypass Surgery

Gastric Bypass Surgery

Gastric Bypass Surgery

Gastric Bypass Surgery

People who have a body mass index (BMI) of over 40 or have a BMI of over 35 coupled with serious health complications like diabetes, sleep apnea, or heart disease, may be eligible for gastric bypass surgery. The first step is a consultation with one of Awazen’s expert surgeons to talk about your health and if gastric bypass surgery is right for you.

The procedure is the most common of the four weight loss surgeries offered at Awazen Medical Center, followed by adjustable gastric banding. Gastric bypass involves making an incision and then dividing the stomach pouch into a small and large section, divided by surgical staples. Then, the surgeon connects the small half of the stomach pouch to the second part of the small intestine instead of the first part so that patients absorb fewer calories overall. For more information on gastric bypass methods like “Roux-en-Y gastric bypass” and the “mini gastric bypass,” get in touch with Awazen today.

Gastric bypass sets itself apart from other related procedures because it is a combination weight loss surgery, combining both restrictive and malabsorptive elements. For example, adjustable gastric banding and sleeve gastrectomy, which are both purely restrictive surgeries that reduce the size of the stomach pouch to limit the amount of food that can be eaten. On the other hand, gastric bypass also uses malabsorptive techniques like changing your digestive system to limit the amount of nutrients that are processed by the body. Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch is another combination weight loss surgery offered by Awazen Medical Center.

Over the course of about two years, most patients who undergo gastric bypass lose two-thirds of their excess body weight. Because the stomach pouch is smaller, patients get accustomed to eating small, healthy meals with plenty of nutrients, and regular exercise builds body shape and tone during the weight loss.

Contact Awazen Medical Center today.